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Overcome your fear of flying

Overcome your fear of flying

How many times have you boarded a flight only to notice a passenger close by looking irritable?
 
You might pass it off as a disruptive flight, the stress of air travel, but they could be suffering from the fear of flying – it becomes more obvious as the turbulence kicks in with clenched fists, heavy breathing and rocking motions. A fear of flying is actually incredibly common, affecting around one in every six adults. We can assure you that airplanes are an incredibly safe mode of transport, so there’s no real need to panic. The key is recognising fear and keeping it under control. Here we share our top tips to reassure the fearful flyer:
 

Rationalise your fear

There’s nothing to fear, and you know that really. Looking at things rationally, we know that the chances of anything going wrong are next to none, and that flying is in fact one of the safest modes of transport there is. Remember: you’re more likely to be involved in an accident crossing the street or driving to work than you are on a flight!
 

Keep distracted

Read a book or listen to some peaceful, calming music to block out the background noise. Your mind tends to wander to perfectly normal flight sounds that are amplified by your fear. Do anything to occupy your mind from the thoughts causing you to panic.
 

Check in early

Arrive at the airport before check in to familiarise yourself with the sights and sounds of flying. Understanding the bumps and movements of the plane. Getting to know what flying is like before you set off will ease the pressure of travelling when turbulence hits.
 

Get comfortable

It’s hard to focus on your safety when you can feel the plane being shook from pillar to post. Close the window cover or ask the person next to you if they wouldn’t mind doing it for you. Closing your eyes and pretending you’re on a bus can really help. It sounds too simple to work, but it does. When it comes down to it, travelling on an airplane sounds no different to your local bus journey. Turbulence often resembles a bumpy road. And your neighbour nodding off and drooling on your shoulder is a real possibility, no matter whether you’re on the highway or 30,000 ft. over the Atlantic.
 

Choose your seat

Minimise turbulence by sitting at the front of the plane, which is less affected than the back. Booking an aisle seat might also help you feel less constricted and panicky.
 

Fly often

Do more of what you fear and that fear will slip away naturally. Don’t be afraid to book a spontaneous venture to a new place; it’s hard at first but the more you do it, the quicker that fear will disappear. Plus you’ll get to enjoy life and perhaps learn a little along the way. What a deal.
 
To give yourself a chance to calm your nerves before take-off, visit http://www.executivelounges.com to book into one of the more luxurious airport lounges.

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